The news may be filled with election policies and TV time is taken up with party political broadcasts but one small matter of the election is rarely covered: election night food.

On Thursday June 8, millions will tune in to watch as the results are announced but, with hours of viewing ahead, it’s important to keep fuelled. Here’s your guide to election food, co-ordinated by party colours.

Dip into this

Your party might have guests from different political persuasions, so make sure you include foods suitable for the four mains: Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrats and Greens.

Downing Street
Credit: Pixabay

Every good gathering starts with a load of dips, so crack out the guacamole (green), salsa (red . . . you get the idea), hummus and blue cheese dip. Everyone can dig in with the tortilla chips for a savoury start, just don’t judge the Green supporter for enjoying the salsa – while political party support is important, enjoying your favourite dip is more so.

Remember, people may support more than one party, and that’s where the inclusive salad comes in. Jamie Oliver’s superfood salad (http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/vegetables-recipes/superfood-salad/) is a bowlful of vibrant vegetables and spices including sweet potato, broccoli and pomegranate. This salad will keep guests feeling full all night, and bring together supporters of all parties.

Elections don’t get much feta than this

No celebration is complete without a cheese board, be it a wedding, a birthday or an election party. Get your guests to bring a slab from their constituency. Think Brighton blue for the Green party, a Cornish Yarg for Conservatives, Caws Teifi for Liberal Democrats and a Northumberlandia for Labour. A cheese board should be served with a selection of crackers, some grapes and celery – the condiments can be politically neutral.

A selection of cheeses
Credit: Pixabay from Pexels

Sausage rolls make or break a party, if they’ve got a crisp flaky pastry and a meaty centre then you’re on to a winner. Make it a game of Russian roulette by filling the sausage rolls with either caramelised red onion, blue cheese, roasted golden beetroot or make it veggie with leeks and cheese. It’s one way get the party started. For a classic sausage roll recipe, give this one a go: http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/bigsausagerolls_86258

If you feel like taking a break from the colour scheme, mix it up with classic foods that the leaders have been snapped eating. Cook up a storm of kebabs and cones of chips that would make May and Corbyn proud.

Cones of chips
Credit: Life Of Pix from Pexels

“As soon as the first mouthful has been eaten, your Labour-loving friends will forget they’re supporting a Tory brownie”

After the savoury feast has been devoured, indulge in a few sweet treats. Brownies are a real crowd-pleaser with their rich flavour and fudgy texture. Plus, it’s pretty easy to adapt them for political preference. Make a big batch and fill some with blueberries, some with raspberries, others with rosemary and others with white chocolate chips. As soon as the first mouthful has been eaten, your Labour-loving friends will forget they’re supporting a Tory brownie. Here’s a basic recipe to get you started: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/sep/09/how-to-make-perfect-brownies

Orange and hazelnut brownies
Credit: Ellie Edwards

You must always have one stand-out cake. For fans of the Great British Bake Off, you’ll know that a showstopper cake can win the competition for you. While the fate of the country doesn’t lie with a Victoria sponge, it’s fun regardless. Make a Battenberg using red, blue, green and yellow food dye and watch as your guests look on with anticipation as you cut the first slice, revealing the colour combinations. Follow this recipe and just change the food colouring: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1120657/battenberg-cake